How much does it cost to build a website?

What is a Content Management System - (CMS)?

Do we need our own domain name?

What are the advantages of OpenSource software?

How much does it cost to build a website?

Websites can vary tremendously according to the build requirements. A simple website can start from as little as a few thousand dollars whilst a complex, fully integrated e-commerce solution can easily move into the 6 figure range. We have found that many medium sized business and government projects that use a content management system often fall into the $25,000 to $60,000 range. To get an accurate indication of what your project would cost, simply make contact with us to have a chat about your requirements.

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What is a Content Management System - (CMS)?

A system or software package used to manage the content and delivery of a Website / Intranet. It allows "subject experts" (your staff) to directly author and manipulate content without needing to understand HTML / XML etc. The sophistication and the level of future proofing with each CMS varies greatly. DB Informatics specialises in eZ publish solutions.
For a detailed definition go to Wikipedia.com

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Do we need our own domain name?

Owning your own domain name holds many advantages. Some of the reasons are:

  • better search engine indexing
  • easier for your clients to remember you
  • appear more professional
  • transportable between hosting companies

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What are the advantages of OpenSource software?

DB Informatics is a committed member of the large and ever increasing OpenSource community. There are many benefits for using OpenSource beyond the $0 software price tag. OpenSource promotes software reliability and quality by supporting independent peer review and rapid evolution of source code. OpenSource software is distributed under a licence (GPL) that guarantees the right to read, redistribute, and modify all code. Users of OpenSource enjoy freedom from control by a single source, freedom from licensing management (with its accompanying risk of audit and litigation), and an increased scalability and flexibility.

Some key points are:

  • Cost effectiveness
    The TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) is significantly reduced with costs being limited to installation, training and support and even these costs are reduced because of community peer support.
  • Security
    OpenSource software is reviewed by a worldwide range of programmers instead of a selected few in a closed environment. It is commonly accepted that security is maximised by exposing flaws publicly and fixing them rapidly. In fact, OpenSource communities by far maintain the best track record for rapid security responses.
  • Flexibility and adaptability
    OpenSource allows you to unify your computing environment and reap the benefits of common protocols and standards, reducing the risk that you will end up with proprietary systems that cannot work with other tools.
  • Ongoing support and development by a community of users
    Fostering an environment where a diversity of users can contribute and support the CMS can be very helpful. If one organisation has found the need for a specific function chances are there are also others, so developments can benefit all involved parties.
  • Programmers can fix problems and add new functions
    There is not a need to rely on the vendor of the CMS to fix issues or add new features. This can be undertaken cost effectively by any programmer, particularly since eZ Publish provides good documentation.
  • OpenSource has shaken off the "poor man's solution image"
    Even long established global companies like IBM, Siemens and Apple are now recognising the effectiveness of OpenSource and GPL. Indeed, Apple is now openly encouraging collaboration with OpenSource developers.
  • Sustainability
    Unviable open source projects are exposed and fade rapidly under open scrutiny while private ventures can sustain momentum even with poorly written software for much longer periods. While Linux is the best known OpenSource product, another well known one is Apache. Apache grew to become the #1 web server as long ago as April 1996. Recently, both Netcraft's and E-soft's surveys of market Share for Active Web Servers confirm Apache's dominance.
    ezembed

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